Regular Visiting Professors

Professor Sandy Goldberg

Professor and Chair of the Department of Philosophy at Northwestern University.
Professor Sandy Goldberg Sanford Goldberg is Professor and Chair of the Department of Philosophy at Northwestern University. He works in the areas of epistemology and the philosophy of mind and language. His most recent research covers themes in traditional epistemology (internalism vs. externalism, justification, evidence you should have had, epistemic luck, epistemic defeat, and skepticism) and social epistemology (testimony, disagreement, the nature of our epistemic reliance on others, and the nature of epistemic communities more generally). He is author of many articles and of several books, including Anti-Individualism: Mind and Language, Knowledge and Justification (Cambridge UP, 2007); Relying on Others: An Essay in Epistemology (OUP, 2010); Assertion: On the Philosophical Significance of Assertoric Speech (OUP, 2015).


Professor John Greco

Leonard and Elizabeth Eslick Chair in Philosophy at Saint Louis University
Professor John Greco John Greco holds the Leonard and Elizabeth Eslick Chair in Philosophy at Saint Louis University. He has published widely on virtue epistemology, skepticism, and Thomas Reid, including: Achieving Knowledge: A Virtue-theoretic Account of Epistemic Evaluation (Cambridge, 2010); Putting Skeptics in Their Place: The Nature of Skeptical Arguments and Their Role in Philosophical Inquiry (Cambridge, 2000); and “How to Reid Moore" (Philosophical QuarterlyI, 2002). He is the editor of American Philosophical Quarterly.


Professor Jakob Hohwy

Professor of Philosophy at Monash University in Melbourne
Professor Jakob Hohwy Jakob Hohwy is Professor of Philosophy at Monash University in Melbourne, Australia. He studied in Aarhus, Denmark, obtained his masters from St. Andrews, Scotland, and his PhD from the Australian National University. Jakob has established the Cognition and Philosophy Lab at Monash University, which conducts empirical experiments and theoretical explorations in philosophy of neuroscience. His approach is highly interdisciplinary, and he collaborates with neuroscientists, psychologists, and psychiatrists on topics such as the neural correlates of consciousness, bistable perception, multisensory integration in autism, and bodily self-awareness. He is the author of The Predictive Mind (OUP, 2013), which seeks to unify many aspects of cognition, perception and consciousness under the notion of prediction error minimization. Jakob is deputy editor of the new journal Neuroscience of Consciousness, published by OUP.


Professor Jonathan Kvanvig

Distinguished Professor of Philosophy at Baylor University
Professor Jonathan Kvanvig Jonathan Kvanvig is Distinguished Professor of Philosophy at Baylor University. His research interests are in metaphysics and epistemology, philosophy of religion, and philosophy of logic and language. He has written, among other books, Rationality and reflection (OUP, 2014) and Destiny and Deliberation (OUP, 2011). He also administers “Certain Doubts” (http://certaindoubts.com/), a weblog devoted to matters epistemic.


Professor Edouard Machery

Associate Professor of History and Philosophy of Science at the University of Pittsburgh
Professor Edouard Machery Edouard Machery is Associate Professor of History and Philosophy of Science at the University of Pittsburgh. His main research interests are in philosophy of psychology, philosophy of mind and experimental philosophy. He published the book Doing without concepts (OUP, 2009).


Professor Sandra D. Mitchell

Professor and Chair of the Department of History and Philosophy of Science, University of Pittsburgh
Prof Sandra Mitchell Sandra D. Mitchell works on a broad range of topics in philosophy of science, philosophy of biology and social science including functional explanation, emergence, models and laws. Her research focuses on scientific explanations of complex behavior, including self-organized division of labor in social insets, psychiatric genetics, and, most recently, protein structure and function. She has been a visiting fellow at Center for Interdisciplinary Studies, Bielefeld; the Institute for Advanced Studies, Berlin; The Max Planck Institute for History of Science, Berlin; and the Max Planck Institute for the Study of Societies, Cologne. Mitchell is the author of Biological Complexity and Integrative Pluralism (Cambridge University Press 2003) and Unsimple Truths: Science, Complexity and Policy (Univ. Chicago Press, 2009). She is a fellow of the American Association for the Advancement of Science, and is currently serving as President of the Philosophy of Science Association (2017-2019).


Professor Margaret Morrison

Professor of Philosophy at the University of Toronto
Margaret Morrison Margaret Morrison is Professor of Philosophy at the University of Toronto where she teaches a broad range of topics in the philosophy of science and in the history of philosophy, especially Kant. Before taking up a position at the University of Toronto she held faculty positions at Stanford University and the University of Minnesota (Minneapolis). In 1995-6 she was a research fellow at the Wissenschaftskolleg zu Berlin and spent many years (1993-2003) as a research fellow at the Centre for the Philosophy of the Natural and Social Sciences at the London School of Economics. In 2004 she was elected to the Leopoldina – the German National Academy of Science. Her monographs include Reconstructing Reality: Mathematics, Models and Simulation (Oxford UP, 2015).


Professor Robert Rupert

Professor of Philosophy at the University of Colorado, Boulder
Professor Robert Rupert Robert Rupert is Professor of Philosophy at the University of Colorado, Boulder. He works in the philosophy of mind, the philosophical foundations of cognitive science, and in related areas of philosophy of language, philosophy of science, and metaphysics. His research focuses particularly on mental representation, concept acquisition, mental causation, situated cognition, group cognition, natural laws, and properties.


Professor Geoff Sayre-McCord

Morehead-Cain Alumni Distinguished Professor of Philosophy at the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hills
Professor Geoff Sayre-McCord Geoff Sayre-McCord is Morehead-Cain Alumni Distinguished Professor of Philosophy at the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hills. He has published extensively on metaethics, moral theory, and the history of modern philosophy (especially Hume and Smith). Recently, his research has focused on the nature of normative concepts, on evolution and morality, and on Adam Smith’s theory of moral sentiments.


Professor Ernest Sosa

Board of Governors Professor at Rutgers University
Professor Ernest Sosa Ernest Sosa is Board of Governors Professor at Rutgers University. His virtue epistemology has been developed in a series of publications, including “The Raft and the Pyramid” Midwest Studies (1980), Knowledge in Perspective (CUP, 1991), A Virtue Epistemology (OUP, 2007), Reflective Knowledge (OUP, 2009), Knowing Full Well (PUP, 2011), and Judgment and Agency (OUP, 2015).


Previous Regular Visiting Professors

Professor Janice Dowell

Associate Professor of Philosophy at Syracuse University
Professor Janice Dowell Janice Dowell is Associate Professor of Philosophy at Syracuse University. Janice’s research interests are in philosophy of language, philosophy of mind, metaphysics, metaethics, and philosophical methodology. Her current work is on the semantics and pragmatics of modal expressions, particularly deontic and epistemic modals.


Professor Connie Rosati

Professor of Philosophy at University of Arizona
Professor Connie Rosati Connie Rosati received a Ph.D. in Philosophy from the University of Michigan and a J.D. from Harvard Law School. She is currently a member of the faculty at the University of Arizona in Tucson, but she has previously taught at Rutgers, Northwestern, the University of Michigan, the University of California, Davis, the University of Pennsylvania Law School, and the University of San Diego Law School. Over the years, she has taught a variety of courses in ethics, political philosophy, law, and the philosophy of law. Her research interests lie principally in the foundations of ethics and in jurisprudential questions about constitutional interpretation and the objectivity of law.


Professor Jessica Wilson

Associate Professor of Philosophy at the University of Toronto
Professor Jessica Wilson Jessica Wilson is Associate Professor of Philosophy at the University of Toronto; prior to 2005 she was William Wilhartz Assistant Professor at the University of Michigan. Wilson's research is primarily in metaphysics, metametaphysics, and epistemology, with applications to philosophy of mind and science. Wilson has also published extensively on how best to formulate physicalism and emergentism and associated intertheoretic relations. Another ongoing project concerns assessing ‘Hume's Dictum’, the thesis that there are no metaphysically necessary connections between distinct entities.